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Countermovement jump performance in elite male and female sprinters and high jumpers

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journal contribution
posted on 23.10.2020, 14:48 by Lydia Philpott, Steph ForresterSteph Forrester, Kate Van-LopikKate Van-Lopik, Steven Hayward, Paul ConwayPaul Conway, Andrew WestAndrew West
Countermovement jumps (CMJs) are widely used in athlete training, performance monitoring and research as an indicator of power output. Despite extensive scientific research on CMJs, data for elite track and field athletes is limited, particularly for non-sprint events and female athletes. The purpose of this study was threefold: (i) to compare CMJ performance between elite sprinters and high jumpers; (ii) to compare CMJ performance between elite male and female athletes in these two events; and (iii) to determine which CMJ take-off parameters correlated most strongly with jump height. Twenty-seven elite athletes (sprinters: nine male and seven female; high jumpers: five male and six female) completed three maximal CMJs. Jump height and take-off phase parameters were obtained from the force–time data and compared between groups; additionally, time series comparisons were performed on the force, power and displacement data. There was no difference in jump height or any of the take-off parameters between the sprinters and high jumpers; however, the time series analysis indicated that the sprinters maintained a lower center of mass position during the latter concentric phase. The male athletes jumped higher than the female athletes (by 10.0 cm or 24.2%; p<0.001) with significantly greater body weight normalized peak power (17.9%, p=0.002) and significantly shorter eccentric time (17.4%, p=0.035). Jump height was most strongly correlated with peak power. In addition, jump height was also strongly correlated with positive impulse and both minimum and mean concentric center of mass position. These results support the importance of accounting for event and gender when investigating CMJ performance.

History

School

  • Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Published in

Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part P: Journal of Sports Engineering and Technology

Volume

235

Issue

2

Pages

131-138

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© IMechE

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Sage under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

21/10/2020

Publication date

2020-11-17

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

1754-3371

eISSN

1754-338X

Language

en

Depositor

Mrs Kate Van Lopik. Deposit date: 21 October 2020