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Current appetite influences relative differences in the expected satiety of foods for momentary, but not hypothetical, expected satiety assessments

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posted on 18.11.2022, 15:15 authored by Chris McLeodChris McLeod, GMW Mycock, A Twells, Lewis JamesLewis James, JM Brunstrom, Gemma WitcombGemma Witcomb
Research has shown that expected satiety is highly associated with portion-size selection and can vary (kcal-for-kcal) significantly between foods. However, research has not adequately investigated whether current appetite influences relative differences in the expected satiety of foods. This is important to explore to better understand how current motivational state influences food choice and portion selection. This study used ‘hypothetical’ and ‘momentary’ expected-satiety assessments to understand whether methods requiring a reflection on current motivational state [momentary] versus more hypothetical considerations when assessing expected satiety can influence the interpretation of results. It was hypothesised that current appetite would only influence relative differences in expected satiety between foods for momentary, but not hypothetical, expected satiety assessments. Participants (n = 54) were shown images of twelve foods, once when hungry and once when full. In each case, they selected a portion for each food to 1) match the expected satiety of a fixed-portion ‘standard’ food [hypothetical], and 2) stave off hunger until their next meal [momentary]. Results showed that the relative between-food comparison of expected satiety was stable for hypothetical (p=.73) but not momentary assessments (p<.001) suggesting that while current motivational state may influence food choice and portion selection in the moment, more generalised comparisons of the satiating abilities of foods (learned over a longer period) remain stable. This is important 1) for methods in future studies, as immediate dietary intake does not appear to influence hypothetical expected satiety, thus dietary control is not necessary before participants undertake these assessments, and 2) as it confirms that difficulties associated with dietary regulation may not be due to inaccurate hypothetical judgements about foods, but instead appear to be influenced by contextual nuances that occur in the moment.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Appetite

Volume

178

Issue

2022

Publisher

Elsevier Ltd.

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by- nc-nd/4.0/).

Acceptance date

29/06/2022

Publication date

2022-07-06

Copyright date

2022

ISSN

0195-6663

eISSN

1095-8304

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Chris McLeod. Deposit date: 19 August 2022

Article number

106159

Ethics review number

Loughborough University SSEHS-UG647