Sociology Paralympic Special 2010 Anonymised Resubmission 2.pdf (96.39 kB)
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Cyborg and supercrip: the paralympics technology and the (dis)empowerment of disabled athletes

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journal contribution
posted on 26.09.2014, 11:16 authored by David Howe
Over the last two decades the Paralympic Games have gained a high public profile. As a result there has been an ever increasing commercial marketplace for aerodynamic and feather light racing (wheel)chairs as well as biomechanically and ergonomically responsive prostheses that have helped create a legion of cyborg bodies that is manifest in the image of the sporting supercrip. Mobility devices that enhance performance have also created a divide between different impairment groups and also amongst ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ nations. This article highlights the development of a technocentric ideology within the Paralympic Movement that has led to the cyborgification of some Paralympic bodies. It questions whether the advances in technology are actually empowering disabled athletes.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

SOCIOLOGY-THE JOURNAL OF THE BRITISH SOCIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION

Volume

45

Issue

5

Pages

868 - 882 (15)

Citation

HOWE, P.D., 2011. Cyborg and supercrip: the paralympics technology and the (dis)empowerment of disabled athletes. Sociology, 45 (5), pp. 868 - 882.

Publisher

SAGE © The Author

Version

SMUR (Submitted Manuscript Under Review)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2011

Notes

This article was published in the journal, Sociology [SAGE © The Author] and the definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0038038511413421

ISSN

0038-0385

Language

en