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Development of a positioning aid to reduce postural variability and errors in 3D whole body scan measurements

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journal contribution
posted on 22.11.2017, 10:56 authored by Frank Schwarz-Muller, Russell MarshallRussell Marshall, Steve SummerskillSteve Summerskill
Three-dimensional (3D) body scanners have the potential to evaluate changes to the human form through different clothing configurations, the use of protective equipment, or the effects of medical interventions. To achieve this, scans of an individual need to be superimposed for each experimental condition. The literature highlights that one of the limiting factors is postural variability. This paper describes a newly developed ‘positioning aid’ that stabilises the posture during the scanning process and is invisible on scans. The results of a study evaluating the efficacy of the positioning aid showed that it reduces postural variability for all body parts in lateral and longitudinal directions. A reference test with a rigid mannequin indicated that the ‘technical’ variability due to the scanner hardware and software significantly contributes to the residual variability. Furthermore, the study showed that the newly developed positioning aid overall increased the precision of the software-assisted extraction of body dimensions.

History

School

  • Design and Creative Arts

Department

  • Design

Published in

Applied Ergonomics

Volume

68

Pages

90 - 100

Citation

SCHWARZ-MULLER, F., MARSHALL, R. and SUMMERSKILL, S., 2018. Development of a positioning aid to reduce postural variability and errors in 3D whole body scan measurements. Applied Ergonomics, 68, pp. 90-100.

Publisher

© Elsevier

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

02/11/2017

Publication date

2017-11-11

Notes

This paper was published in the journal Applied Ergonomics and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2017.11.001.

ISSN

0003-6870

eISSN

1872-9126

Language

en