Perera2021_Article_DifferentialEffectsOfMinifiedA.pdf (646.91 kB)

Differential effects of minified and magnified mirror visual feedback on the underlying misperception of hand size

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journal contribution
posted on 19.04.2021, 11:21 by Treshi-Marie Perera, Jiun Ting Tan, Poo Shin Mu, Roger Newport
Perception of the size of body parts, for instance the hand, has been shown to be distorted in healthy participants, with over- and under-estimations of width and length respectively. Illusory manipulations of body shape and size have highlighted the flexibility of the body representation and have also been found to update immediate perceptions of body size and surrounding objects. Here, we examined whether underlying misperceptions of hand width and length can be modified through exposure to illusory changes in hand size using a mirror visual feedback (MVF) paradigm. While questionnaire responses indicated subjective susceptibility to both magnified and minified to minifying mirrors. These variations might reflect differences in the way that stored representations are accessed or updated in response to size manipulations. Secondly the findings further reinforce differences between subjective and objective outcomes of illusions on subsequent body perception.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics

Volume

83

Pages

2281-2290

Publisher

Springer

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Springer under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

25/01/2021

Publication date

2021-03-22

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

1943-3921

eISSN

1943-393X

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Roger Newport. Deposit date: 5 February 2021