Perry_wea.3854 (1).pdf (3.93 MB)
Download file

Direct observations of a Mt Everest snowstorm from the world’s highest surface-based radar observations

Download (3.93 MB)
journal contribution
posted on 15.12.2020, 16:12 by L Baker Perry, Sandra Yuter, Tom Matthews, Patrick Wagnon, Arbindra Khadka, Deepak Aryal, Dibas Shrestha, Alex Tait, Matthew Miller, Alex O'Neil, Spencer Rhodes, Inka Koch, Tenzing Sherpa, Subash Tuladhar, Saraju Baidya, Sandra Elvin, Aurora Elmore, Ananta Gajurel, Paul Mayewski
This paper details the world’s highest surface-based vertically pointing radar observations from Nepal’s Everest Base Camp during a snowstorm on 17 April 2019. The radar echo extended higher than the summit of Mt. Everest at times and indicated turbulence and environments favorable for riming. The observed precipitation and velocity structures are similar to those observed in other mountainous areas and suggest that satellite-based remote sensing of snowstorms can utilize assumptions of similar structures across a range of elevations.

Funding

National Science Foundation through Grants AGS-1347179 and AGS-1905736.

French Service d’Observation GLACIOCLIM (part of IR OZCAR).

Labex OSUG@2020 (Investissements d’avenir – ANR10 LABX56).

History

School

  • Social Sciences and Humanities

Department

  • Geography and Environment

Published in

Weather

Volume

76

Issue

2

Pages

57-59

Publisher

Wiley

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Wiley under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

08/09/2020

Publication date

2020-10-16

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0043-1656

eISSN

1477-8696

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Tom Matthews. Deposit date: 8 September 2020