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Distributing democratic influence: external efficacy and the preferred influence of policy winners and losers

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journal contribution
posted on 2023-01-06, 14:43 authored by Anthony KevinsAnthony Kevins

Should those who would be disproportionately affected by a policy change have more influence on that reform than the average citizen? And does it matter whether the affected individuals stand to benefit or lose out from the proposed reform? Despite longstanding debates on proportionality, asymmetry, and affected interests in the democratic theory literature, we know little about public opinion on these questions. This study therefore uses an original survey of 3200 US respondents to explore these attitudes. To do so, it builds on related work highlighting the potential relevance of the type of affectedness as well as individual-level variation in political efficacy, examining: (1) the relationship between the preferred influence of negatively versus positively affected citizens; and (2) the role of external efficacy in shaping these preferences. Results suggest that most respondents favour equal influence regardless of affectedness, but that greater external efficacy may increase the preferred influence of negatively and positively affected citizens.

Funding

European Commission’s Horizon 2020 Programme via a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship (Grant no. 750556)

History

School

  • Social Sciences and Humanities

Department

  • International Relations, Politics and History

Published in

International Journal of Public Opinion Research

Volume

34

Issue

4

Pages

1-11

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Author

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Acceptance date

2022-10-31

Publication date

2022-12-17

Copyright date

2022

ISSN

0954-2892

eISSN

1471-6909

Language

  • en

Depositor

Dr Anthony Kevins. Deposit date: 14 November 2022

Article number

edac035

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