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Does Vestibular-Ocular-Motor (VOM) impairment affect time to return to play, symptom severity, neurocognition and academic ability in student-athletes following acute concussion?

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journal contribution
posted on 28.05.2021, 14:40 by Kerry GlendonKerry Glendon, Glen BlenkinsopGlen Blenkinsop, A Belli, Matthew PainMatthew Pain
Introduction: Research indicates Sports-Related Concussion (SRC) impairs Vestibular-Ocular-Motor (VOM) function. The aim was to explore if VOM impairment correlates with longer Return To Play (RTP), symptom burden, neurocognitive performance and academic capability. Participants: 40 (61.4% male) Loughborough University, UK, rugby union student-athletes who sustained 42 SRCs. Methods: Student-athletes completed an assessment battery during pre-season (baseline), 2, 4, 8 and 14 days post-SRC and prior to RTP and were managed according to the rugby Football Union’ community pathway. Outcome measures: Vestibular Ocular-Motor Screening (VOMS), Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test, Post-Concussion Symptom Scale, Perceived Academic Impairment Tool questionnaire and percentage of academic activities specifically missed due to SRC. Results: VOMS scores were significantly (p < 0.005) greater than baseline at all time points except RTP. Presence of VOM dysfunction at 14 days post-SRC significantly correlated with a longer RTP, greater symptom burden and increased odds ratio at 2, 4 and 8 days and academic time loss at 2, 4 and 8 days post-SRC. Conclusion: VOM impairment is associated with an increased symptom burden and impaired academic capability, and a longer time to RTP when present at 14 days post-SRC.

Funding

Musculoskeletal Association of Chartered Physiotherapists [Level 3 Award]; Association of chartered physiotherapists in sports and exercise medicine [ACPSEM Research Grant]

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Brain Injury

Volume

35

Issue

7

Pages

788-797

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Taylor and Francis

Publisher statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Brain Injury on 24 Apr 2021, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2021.1911001

Acceptance date

23/03/2021

Publication date

2021-04-24

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0269-9052

eISSN

1362-301X

Language

en

Location

England

Depositor

Dr Matthew Pain. Deposit date: 28 May 2021