japplphysiol.00264.2021.pdf (1.07 MB)
Download file

Does the reticulospinal tract mediate adaptation to resistance training in humans?

Download (1.07 MB)
journal contribution
posted on 20.09.2022, 13:00 authored by Elliot Atkinson, Jakob SkarabotJakob Skarabot, Paul Ansdell, Stuart Goodall, Glyn Howatson, Kevin Thomas

Resistance training increases volitional force producing capacity, and it is widely accepted that such an increase is partly underpinned by adaptations in the central nervous system, particularly in the early phases of training. Despite this, the neural substrate(s) responsible for mediating adaptation remains largely unknown. Most studies have focused on the corticospinal tract, the main descending pathway controlling movement in humans, with equivocal findings. It is possible that neural adaptation to resistance training is mediated by other structures; one such candidate is the reticulospinal tract. The aim of this narrative mini review is to articulate the potential of the reticulospinal tract to underpin adaptations in muscle strength. Specifically, we 1) discuss why the structure and function of the reticulospinal tract implicates it as a potential site for adaptation; 2) review the animal and human literature that supports the idea of the reticulospinal tract as an important neural substrate underpinning adaptation to resistance training; and 3) examine the potential methodological options to assess the reticulospinal tract in humans.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Journal of Applied Physiology

Volume

133

Issue

3

Pages

689 - 696

Publisher

American Physiological Society

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by American Physiological Society under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

05/07/2022

Publication date

2022-07-14

Copyright date

2022

ISSN

8750-7587

eISSN

1522-1601

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Jakob Skarabot. Deposit date: 6 July 2022

Usage metrics

Categories

Licence

Exports