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Earlier detection facilitates skilled responses to deceptive actions

journal contribution
posted on 22.11.2021, 09:41 authored by Laurence S. Warren-West, Robin JacksonRobin Jackson, Glen BlenkinsopGlen Blenkinsop, Michael HileyMichael Hiley
High-skilled and recreational rugby players were placed in a semi-immersive CAREN Lab environment to examine susceptibility to, and detection of, deception. To achieve this, a broad window of seven occlusion times was used in which participants responded to life-size video clips of an opposing player ‘cutting’ left or right, with or without a deceptive sidestep. Participants made full-body responses to ‘intercept’ the player and gave a verbal judgement of the opponent's final running direction. Response kinematic and kinetic data were recorded using three-dimensional motion capture cameras and force plates, respectively. Based on response accuracy, the results were separated into deception susceptibility and deception detection windows then signal detection analysis was used to calculate indices of discriminability between genuine and deceptive actions (d’) and judgement bias (c). Analysis revealed that high-skilled and low-skilled players were similarly susceptible to deception; however, high-skilled players detected deception earlier in the action sequence, which enabled them to make more effective behavioural responses to deceptive actions.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Human Movement Science

Volume

80

Pages

(13)

Publisher

Elsevier

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Elsevier

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Human Movement Science and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2021.102885

Acceptance date

28/09/2021

Publication date

2021-10-19

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0167-9457

eISSN

1872-7646

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Robin Jackson. Deposit date: 19 November 2021

Article number

102885