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Effect of a baby-friendly workplace support intervention on exclusive breastfeeding in Kenya

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posted on 02.06.2021, 11:30 by Elizabeth W. Kimani-Murage, Calistus Wilunda, Teresia Njoki Macharia, Eva Watiri Kamande, Peter Muriuki Gatheru, Tadesse Zerfu, Hermann Pythagore Pierre Donfouet, Laura Kiige, Susan Jabando, Lynette Aoko Dinga, Betty Samburu, Richard Lilford, Paula GriffithsPaula Griffiths, Debra Jackson, France Begin, Grainne Moloney
Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) during the first 6 months of life is crucial for optimizing child growth, development and survival, as well as the mother's wellbeing. Mother's employment may hinder optimal breastfeeding, especially in the first 6 months. We assessed the effectiveness of a baby-friendly workplace support intervention on EBF in Kenya. This pre-post intervention study was conducted between 2016 and 2018 on an agricultural farm in Kericho County. The intervention targeted pregnant/breastfeeding women residing on the farm and consisted of workplace support policies and programme interventions including providing breastfeeding flexi-time and breaks for breastfeeding mothers; day-care centres (crèches) for babies near the workplace and lactation centres with facilities for breast milk expression and storage at the crèches; creating awareness on available workplace support for breastfeeding policies; and home-based nutritional counselling for pregnant and breastfeeding women. EBF was measured through 24-h recall. The effect of the intervention on EBF was estimated using propensity score weighting. The study included 270 and 146 mother–child dyads in the nontreated (preintervention) group and treated (intervention) group, respectively. The prevalence of EBF was higher in the treated group (80.8%) than in the nontreated group (20.2%); corresponding to a fourfold increased probability of EBF [risk ratio (RR) 3.90; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.95–5.15]. The effect of the intervention was stronger among children aged 3–5 months (RR 8.13; 95% CI 4.23–15.64) than among those aged <3 months (RR 2.79; 95% CI 2.09–3.73). The baby-friendly workplace support intervention promoted EBF especially beyond 3 months in this setting.

Funding

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Grant/Award Number: 43191524

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Maternal and Child Nutrition

Volume

17

Issue

4

Publisher

John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Wiley under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

15/03/2021

Publication date

2021-04-08

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

1740-8695

eISSN

1740-8709

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Paula Griffiths. Deposit date: 1 June 2021

Article number

e13191