Temel2021_Article_EvaluatingTheDesignAndRepeatab.pdf (1.71 MB)

Evaluating the design and repeatability of a novel device to measure friction of mechanical surrogate skins in contact with cotton textiles

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journal contribution
posted on 26.08.2021, 11:03 by Mevra TemelMevra Temel, Alex LloydAlex Lloyd, Andrew JohnsonAndrew Johnson
The ability to measure the level of friction between the human skin and a given textile is critical across fashion and textiles sectors, not least for the development of sporting and protective clothing. A portable custom-made device capable of measuring friction during the skin-textile interaction across often difficult or impossible to investigate body regions with objective repeatability has been established. The friction between a pre-shrunk 100% cotton textile and a quantity of four control surfaces (transparent and patterned polycarbonate plastic, and silicon and lorica surrogate skin) was measured three times per day across five consecutive days. The results clearly demonstrated that the novel friction test device had an excellent repeatability of 0.94 and 0.93 intraclass corelation coefficient (ICC) for static and dynamic friction coefficient measurement, respectively. The silicon surrogate skin control surface produced the highest friction coefficient, while the pattered polycarbonate plate demonstrated the lowest friction coefficient, suggesting that the physical features of the control surface material influenced the recorded coefficient of friction. It was also revealed that the relationship between the static and dynamic friction coefficient is dependent on the surface material.

Funding

Ministry of National Education (the Republic of Turkey) PhD scholarship

History

School

  • Design and Creative Arts

Department

  • Design

Published in

Tribology Letters

Volume

69

Issue

4

Publisher

Springer

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Springer under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

14/08/2021

Publication date

2021-08-23

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

1023-8883

eISSN

1573-2711

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Andrew Johnson. Deposit date: 16 August 2021

Article number

121