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Tolfrey_Exercise recovery practices of wheelchair court sports athletes Oct 2020.pdf (369.72 kB)

Exercise recovery practices of wheelchair court sports athletes

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posted on 2020-10-27, 11:27 authored by Conor Murphy, Barry Mason, Vicky Goosey-TolfreyVicky Goosey-Tolfrey
Research that describes the practices of Paralympic athletes beyond training and competition, and how they periodise recovery is limited. This study investigated if and why athletes in wheelchair court sports (basketball, rugby and tennis) use recovery strategies, what types of strategies they use, and if the period of the season influences prevalence of use. A cross sectional questionnaire was developed to acquire data pertaining to individual characteristics, recovery habits, reasons for use/non-use, information on each specific recovery strategy used and lifestyle habits. 144 athletes (92 = international, 52 = national/club) completed the questionnaire online. In total, 85% (n = 122) of athletes reported using at least one type of recovery strategy, yet most specific types of recovery strategies were not popularly used (< 34% of recovery strategy users). The most commonly used type of recovery strategy was stretching (n = 117), while both stretching and heat-related recovery were the most highly rated types of recovery strategies (μ = 4.2/5). The three most prevalent reasons for use across all strategies were “reduces muscle soreness”, “reduces muscle tightness” and “reduces muscle spasms”. The prevalence of sleep complaints was also highlighted by 38% (n = 55) of respondents. This study highlights that while the frequent use of well-known recovery practices is positive, the lack of diversity in strategies implemented may have implications due to the specific requirements of exercise recovery. Therefore, strength and conditioning professionals should educate wheelchair-athletes further around this area and increase the range of recovery- and impairment- specific strategies used.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Volume

35

Issue

2

Pages

366 - 372

Publisher

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© National Strength and Conditioning Association

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003926.

Acceptance date

2020-10-25

Publication date

2020-12-16

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

1064-8011

eISSN

1533-4287

Language

  • en

Depositor

Prof Vicky Tolfrey Deposit date: 26 October 2020

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