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Eye movements and time-based selection: where do the eyes go in preview search

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journal contribution
posted on 05.07.2011, 09:20 by Derrick G. Watson, Matthew Inglis
In visual search tasks, presenting one set of distractors (previewing them) before a second set which contains the target, improves search efficiency compared to when all items appear simultaneously. It has been proposed that this preview benefit reflects an attentional bias against old information and towards new information. Here we tested directly whether there was such a bias by measuring eye movement behavior. The main findings were that fixations were biased against, and overall dwell times were shorter on, old stimuli during search in the preview condition. In addition, the initial onset of search was delayed in the preview condition and saccades made during the preview period did not disrupt the ability to prioritize new items. The data demonstrate directly that preview search results in an attentional bias towards new items and against old items.

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematics Education Centre

Citation

WATSON, D.G. and INGLIS, M., 2007. Eye movements and time-based selection: where do the eyes go in preview search. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14 (5), pp. 852-857.

Publisher

© Psychonomic Society / Springer

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publication date

2007

Notes

The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com

ISSN

1069-9384

Language

en

Exports

Loughborough Publications

Categories

Exports