Fashion and Dress Culture accepted version.pdf (80.35 kB)
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Fashion and dress culture

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journal contribution
posted on 04.10.2016, 08:57 by Sarah ParkerSarah Parker
This article summarises the significant critical works on fashion and dress culture in 19th-century literature published during the last 10 years, identifying the key trends in this area of scholarship, including work on shopping and consumption, the ‘shopgirl’ and the needlewoman, and reform movements such as the Rational and Aesthetic dress movements. During the 19th century, dress was a battleground on which a number of key debates were fought and contested. But whilst fashion and art historians have long been interested in this period, literary studies has tended to overlook dress, perhaps due to fashion being associated with shallowness and triviality. Fortunately, in the last 10 years, there has been a noticeable increase in critical work that focuses on the important role of fashion and dress in 19th-century literature and culture. Such work moves beyond viewing dress as merely a metaphor or symbolic device – instead approaching dress as a cultural phenomenon worthy of attention in its own right.

History

School

  • The Arts, English and Drama

Department

  • English and Drama

Published in

Literature Compass

Volume

11

Issue

8

Pages

583 - 591

Citation

PARKER, S., 2014. Fashion and dress culture. Literature Compass, 11 (8), pp.583-591.

Publisher

© John Wiley & Sons

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2014

Notes

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: PARKER, S., 2014. Fashion and dress culture. Literature Compass, 11 (8), pp.583-591, which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/lic3.12160. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

ISSN

1741-4113

Language

en