Fetal growth does not modify the relationship of infant weight gain with childhood adiposity and blood pressure in the Southampton women s survey.pdf (1.78 MB)
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Fetal growth does not modify the relationship of infant weight gain with childhood adiposity and blood pressure in the Southampton women’s survey

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journal contribution
posted on 17.12.2019 by Thomas Norris, Sarah Crozier, Noel Cameron, Keith Godfrey, Hazel Inskip, Will Johnson

Background: Rapid infant weight gain is a risk factor for childhood obesity. This relationship may depend on whether infant weight gain is preceded by in-utero growth restriction.

Aim: Examine whether fetal growth modifies the relationship between infant weight gain and childhood adiposity and blood pressure.

Subjects and methods: 786 children in the Southampton Women’s Survey. We related infant weight gain (weight at 2 years-birth weight) to body mass index (BMI), %body fat, trunk fat (kg), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at age 6-7 years. Mean estimated fetal weight (EFW) between 19-34 weeks and change in EFW (19-34 weeks) were added to models as effect modifiers.

Results: Infant weight gain was positively associated with all childhood outcomes. We found no evidence that these effects were modified by fetal growth (p>0.1 for all interaction terms). For example, a 1 standard deviation (SD) increase in infant weight gain was associated with an increase in BMI z-score of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37;0.64) when EFW-change was set at -2 SD-scores compared with an increase of 0.41 (95% CI 0.27;0.54,p(interaction)=0.48) when set at 2 SD-scores.

Conclusion: The documented adverse consequences of rapid infant weight gain may occur regardless of whether growth was constrained in-utero.


Funding

UK Medical Research Council (MRC) New Investigator Research Grant (MR/P023347/1)

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Annals of Human Biology

Volume

47

Issue

2

Pages

150 - 158

Publisher

Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Acceptance date

17/12/2019

Publication date

2020-05-20

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

0301-4460

eISSN

1464-5033

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Tom Norris Deposit date: 17 December 2019

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