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Forty-two or two-and-forty: learning maths in different languages

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journal contribution
posted on 09.07.2020, 08:45 by Julia Bahnmueller, Hans-Christoph Nuerk, Krzysztof Cipora
Doing basic maths seems to be a pretty common thing. 2 + 2 equals 4, both in France and in China. 7 × 8 equals 56, both in the United States of America and in Germany. Although most of us use the same symbols to write down numbers (1, 2, 3, 4 ...), we use very different words for these numbers simply because we speak different languages. In this article, we will give examples of what number words in different languages look like. We also show how the way multi-digit number words are built can make learning maths and dealing with large numbers easier or more difficult.

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematics Education Centre

Published in

Frontiers for Young Minds

Volume

8

Publisher

Frontiers Media SA

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© Bahnmueller, Nuerk and Cipora

Publisher statement

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

Acceptance date

29/05/2020

Publication date

2020-07-30

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

2296-6846

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Julia Bahnmuller. Deposit date: 8 July 2020

Article number

84

Licence

Exports

Loughborough Publications

Categories

Licence

Exports