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Fostering early numerical competencies by playing conventional board games

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journal contribution
posted on 14.01.2021, 14:16 authored by Hedwig Gasteiger, Korbinian MoellerKorbinian Moeller
Recent evidence indicates that playing numerical board games is beneficial for the numerical development of preschoolers. However, board games used in these studies were often specifically developed for training numerical skills. Therefore, we examined whether similar beneficial effects could be observed for playing conventional board games such as Parcheesi. In an intervention study with seven 30-min training sessions over a period of 4 weeks, we observed that 4- to 6-year-old children (Mage = 4 years 11 months) who played conventional board games with traditional number dice (with dot faces numbered from one to six) benefitted more from the board games than children who played board games with color or non-numerical symbol dice. Pretest–post test comparisons indicated differential effects on counting skills and the ability to recognize and use structures. Beyond these immediate training effects observed in post test, the differential beneficial effects of playing board games using traditional dot dice on recognizing and using structures was still present in a follow-up test 1 year after the intervention. Thus, playing conventional board games using traditional number dice seems to be an effective low threshold intervention to foster early numerical competencies.

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematics Education Centre

Published in

Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

Volume

204

Publisher

Elsevier BV

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Elsevier under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Publication date

2021-01-02

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0022-0965

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Korbinian Moeller. Deposit date: 12 January 2021

Article number

105060