sorry, we can't preview this file

...but you can still download aspm-4-037.pdf
aspm-4-037.pdf (640.73 kB)

Four weeks of omega-3 supplementation does not improve cycling time trial performance in trained cyclists

Download (640.73 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 12.01.2021, 10:51 by Lynsey James, Alex J Wadley, Boakye Gyimah, David Hunter, Tom Rosser, Jim Reynolds, Sarabjit Mastana, Martin Lindley
Objectives
This study examined whether omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation lowered the heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and oxygen uptake (V̇O2) and accordingly improved cycling performance in a time trial.

Design
In a randomised, crossover, double-blind study, trained male cyclists (n = 10) were supplemented for 4 weeks with n-3 PUFA (5.7 g/day of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA)) and 4 weeks with placebo (6g olive oil), with a 4-week washout period.

Methods
Cycling performance trials (45 min preload at 70% maximal work rate (Wmax) followed by 15 min time trial) were carried out prior to and following both supplementation periods. Fatty acid composition of blood total lipids was analysed prior to and in response to supplementation.

Results
Whole blood n-3 PUFA (% total fatty acids) increased from 1.67% (SD = 0.99%) to 3.72% (SD = 1.22%) (p < 0.05) following 4 weeks n-3 PUFA supplementation. Submaximal measures of V̇O2, HR, respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and RPE were unaffected by supplementation. Time trial performance (mean power W) was unchanged by n-3 PUFA (pre 239 W, SD = 34 W vs post 243 W, SD = 33 W), as were measures of V̇O2, HR, RER and RPE during the time trial.

Conclusions
High dose n-3 PUFA supplementation for 4 weeks did not improve cycling performance or attenuate the physiological variables usually associated with improved cycling performance, i.e. V̇O2 and HR, in a repeated-measures, placebo-controlled, crossover design study. It is possible that the exercise protocol used in the study was of insufficient intensity for the n-3 PUFA to show beneficial affects due to the highly trained nature of the cyclists.

Funding

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Diet, Lifestyle & Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit based at University Hospitals of Leicester and Loughborough University

History

School

  • Science
  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Department

  • Chemistry

Published in

Archives of Sports Medicine

Volume

4

Issue

2

Pages

233 - 239

Publisher

Scholars.Direct

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Scholars.Direct under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

10/11/2020

Publication date

2020-11-12

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

2578-6334

eISSN

2578-6334

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Martin Lindley. Deposit date: 11 January 2021

Usage metrics

Loughborough Publications

Categories

Licence

Exports