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Guided recovery: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of service users' experiences of guided self-help for bulimic and binge eating disorders

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journal contribution
posted on 31.08.2017, 15:35 authored by Carolyn PlateauCarolyn Plateau, F.A. Brookes, M. Pugh
The efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-based Guided Self-Help for mild to moderate bulimia and binge eating disorders has been well supported. However, limited research has explored in-depth individual experiences of this treatment approach. In depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with four individuals who had completed Cognitive Behavioral Therapy based Guided Self Help (CBT-GSH) for bulimic or binge eating disorders. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and subsequently analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Three superordinate themes emerged: Autonomy and volition; A dynamic relationship: the guided and the guide; and The unwanted friend. The reciprocal nature of the guide/guided relationship was identified as integral to the success of the therapeutic approach. However, participants expressed initial uncertainty towards the therapeutic process, and experienced an uncomfortable dissonance between a lack of volition in therapy seeking and the need to continually self-prescribe CBT-GSH. The findings affirm the central role of the guide in promoting motivation to engage with therapy and highlight the potential benefits of in-session weighing. However, it may be necessary to provide additional support on commencing CBT-GSH to address concerns about the therapeutic approach in this group.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Cognitive and Behavioral Practice

Volume

25

Issue

2

Citation

PLATEAU, C.R., BROOKES, F.A. and PUGH, M., 2017. Guided recovery: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of service users' experiences of guided self-help for bulimic and binge eating disorders. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 25(2), pp. 310-318.

Publisher

© Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Published by Elsevier Ltd

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Cognitive and Behavioral Practice and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2017.08.004.

Acceptance date

19/08/2017

Publication date

2017-09-09

ISSN

1077-7229

Language

en