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High density lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality: too much of a good thing?

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journal contribution
posted on 05.01.2018, 10:41 by Mark Hamer, Gary O'Donovan, Emmanuel Stamatakis
Objective: To examine the shape of the association between high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and mortality in a large general population sample. Approach and results: Adult participants (n=37,059, age= 57.7±11.9 years, 46.8% men) were recruited from general population household-based surveys (Health Survey for England and Scottish Health Survey). Individual participant data were linked with the British National Health Service Central Registry to record mortality. There were 2,250 deaths from all causes during 326,016 person-years of follow-up. When compared to the reference category (HDL-C = 1.5 – 1.99 mmol·L-1) a U-shaped association was apparent for all-cause mortality, with elevated risk in participants with the lowest (Hazard ratio=1.23, 95% CI, 1.06, 1.44) and highest (1.25; 0.97, 1.62) HDL-C concentration. Associations for cardiovascular disease were linear, and elevated risk was observed in those with the lowest HDL-C concentration (1.49; 1.15, 1.94). Conclusions: A U-shaped association was observed between HDL-C and mortality in a large general population sample.

Funding

Stamatakis is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) through a Senior Research Fellowship.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology

Citation

HAMER, M., O'DONOVAN, G. and STAMATAKIS, E., 2018. High density lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality: too much of a good thing?. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 38, pp. 669-672.

Publisher

© American Heart Association

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

27/12/2017

Publication date

2018

Notes

This paper was published in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1161/ATVBAHA.117.310587.

ISSN

1079-5642

eISSN

1524-4636

Language

en