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How green is this paper?

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journal contribution
posted on 21.11.2016, 12:33 authored by Toby Miller
The increasing governmentalization and commodification of knowledge are putting intense pressure on scholars to write and publish more, and in accordance with conventions that are not of their own making, due to benchmarks of success set by the applied sciences that suit business and the state. These tendencies are also producing a potentially unsustainable environmental burden that may be increasing, not decreasing, as we move more and more into an online publishing world. This recognition leads to three provocations: 1) There is too much scholarly publication to keep up with, and too much pressure to publish; 2) The future of all academic publishing will largely be determined by the sciences; and 3) We must consider the relative merits of publishing electronically rather than on paper in terms of the environment—in other words, asking “how green is this paper?”

History

School

  • Loughborough University London

Published in

Culture Unbound : Journal of Current Cultural Research

Volume

7

Pages

588 - 99

Citation

MILLER, T., 2016. How green is this paper? Culture Unbound : Journal of Current Cultural Research, 7, theme 4, pp. 588-99.

Publisher

© The Author. Published by Linkoping University

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Publication date

2016

Notes

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Linkoping University under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence (CC BY-NC). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

ISSN

2000-1525

Language

en