File(s) under permanent embargo

Reason: This item is currently closed access.

Implicit perceptual training: how, when, and why?

journal contribution
posted on 20.07.2016, 10:33 authored by Robin JacksonRobin Jackson, Damian Farrow
The perceptual skills underlying anticipatory movement in sport have been the focus of much research over the past 20 years. Methods for training such skills have tended to emphasise explicit specification of discriminative cues and the rules linking changes in the perceptual field with required responses. Recently, researchers have begun to examine less prescriptive methods of training. In the present paper, we examine conceptual, methodological, and practical issues associated with whether such skills can or indeed should be trained implicitly. The implications of two ways of conceptualising the explicit–implicit distinction for the methods used to promote implicit learning and the tests used to assess the nature of learning are considered. Finally, potential advantages of implicitly learned skills relating to task complexity and robustness under stress are discussed.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Human Movement Science

Volume

24

Pages

308 - 325

Citation

JACKSON, R. and FARROW, D., 2005. Implicit perceptual training: how, when, and why? Human Movement Science, DOI: 10.1016/j.humov.2005.06.003.

Publisher

© Elsevier

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2005

Notes

Closed access.

ISSN

1872-7646

eISSN

0167-9457

Language

en