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Intelligence and negation biases on the Conditional Inference Task: a dual-processes analysis

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journal contribution
posted on 29.04.2014, 13:49 by Nina Attridge, Matthew InglisMatthew Inglis
We examined a large set of conditional inference data compiled from several previous studies and asked three questions: How is normative performance related to intelligence? Does negative conclusion bias stem from Type 1 or Type 2 processing? Does implicit negation bias stem from Type 1 or Type 2 processing? Our analysis demonstrated that rejecting denial of the antecedent and affirmation of the consequent inferences was positively correlated with intelligence, while endorsing modus tollens inferences was not; that the occurrence of negative conclusion bias was related to the extent of Type 2 processing; and that the occurrence of implicit negation bias was not related to the extent of Type 2 processing. We conclude that negative conclusion bias is, at least in part, a product of Type 2 processing, while implicit negation bias is not.

Funding

This work was partially funded by a Royal Society Worshipful Company of Actuaries Education Research Fellowship to M. Inglis.

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematics Education Centre

Citation

ATTRIDGE, N. and INGLIS, M., 2014. Intelligence and negation biases on the Conditional Inference Task: a dual-processes analysis. Thinking and Reasoning, 20 (4), pp. 454-471.

Publisher

© Taylor & Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publication date

2014

Notes

This article was published in the journal Thinking and Reasoning [© Taylor and Francis]. The definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13546783.2014.897254

ISSN

1354-6783

eISSN

1464-0708

Language

en