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Intradialytic cycling does not exacerbate microparticles or circulating markers of systemic inflammation in haemodialysis patients

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journal contribution
posted on 03.12.2021, 09:05 by Patrick Highton, Daniel March, Darren Churchward, Charlotte Grantham, Hannah Young, Matthew Graham-Brown, Seila Estruel, Naomi Martin, Nigel Brunskill, Alice Smith, James Burton, Nicolette BishopNicolette Bishop
Purpose
Patients receiving haemodialysis (HD) display elevated circulating microparticle (MP) concentration, tissue factor (TF) expression and markers of systemic inflammation, though regular intradialytic cycling (IDC) may have a therapeutic effect. This study investigated the impact of regular, moderate-intensity IDC on circulating MPs and inflammatory markers in unit-based HD patients.

Methods
Patients were cluster-randomised to intervention (n = 20, age: 51.4 ± 18.1 years, body mass: 77.6 ± 18.3 kg, mean ± SD) or no-exercise control (n = 20, 56.8 ± 14.0 years, 80.5 ± 26.5 kg). Intervention participants completed 30 min of moderate intensity (rating of perceived exertion [RPE] of 12–14) IDC, thrice weekly for 6 months. Pre-dialysis venous blood samples were obtained at 0, 3 and 6 months. Circulating MP phenotypes, cytokines, chemokine and MP TF expression were quantified using flow cytometry and cytometric bead array assays.

Results
Despite high exercise compliance (82%), no IDC-dependent effects were observed for any MP, cytokine or chemokine measure (p ≥ 0.051, ηρ2 ≤ 0.399) other than TNF-α (p = 0.001, ηρ2 = 0.186), though no significance was revealed upon post hoc analysis.

Conclusion
Six months of regular, moderate-intensity IDC had no effect on MPs, cytokines or chemokines. This suggests that the exercise did not exacerbate thrombotic or inflammatory status, though further functional assays are required to confirm this.

Trial registration
ISRCTN1129707, prospectively registered on 05/03/2015.

Funding

The CYCLE-HD study was funded by a grant from the National Institute of Health Research (CS-2013-13-014) and supported by the Stoneygate Trust. This research was also supported by the NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre. Hannah Young is supported by a grant from the NIHR (DRF-2016-09-015).

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

European Journal of Applied Physiology

Publisher

Springer

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Springer under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

09/11/2021

Publication date

2021-12-02

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

1439-6319

eISSN

1439-6327

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Lettie Bishop. Deposit date: 2 December 2021