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Is the SNARC effect related to the level of mathematics? No systematic relationship observed despite more power, more repetitions, and more direct assessment of arithmetic skill

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posted on 23.04.2020, 09:30 by Krzysztof CiporaKrzysztof Cipora, Hans-Christoph Nuerk
The SNARC (spatial-numerical association of response codes) described that larger numbers are responded faster with the right hand and smaller numbers with the left hand. It is held in the literature that arithmetically skilled and nonskilled adults differ in the SNARC. However, the respective data are descriptive, and the decisive tests are nonsignificant. Possible reasons for this nonsignificance could be that in previous studies (a) very small samples were used, (b) there were too few repetitions producing too little power and, consequently, reliabilities that were too small to reach conventional significance levels for the descriptive skill differences in the SNARC, and (c) general mathematical ability was assessed by the field of study of students, while individual arithmetic skills were not examined. Therefore we used a much bigger sample, a lot more repetitions, and direct assessment of arithmetic skills to explore relations between the SNARC effect and arithmetic skills. Nevertheless, a difference in SNARC effect between arithmetically skilled and nonskilled participants was not obtained. Bayesian analysis showed positive evidence of a true null effect, not just a power problem. Hence we conclude that the idea that arithmetically skilled and nonskilled participants generally differ in the SNARC effect is not warranted by our data. © 2013 The Experimental Psychology Society.

Funding

German Research Foundation (DFG) by means of a project within the Research Group (Forschergruppe) Analyse und Förderung effektiver Lehr-Lern-Prozesse (FOR 738/2/TP02)

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematical Sciences

Published in

Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume

66

Issue

10

Pages

1974 - 1991

Publisher

Routledge

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© The Experimental Psychology Society

Publisher statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology on 01 Oct 2013, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2013.772215http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI].

Publication date

2013-10-01

Copyright date

2013

ISSN

1747-0218

eISSN

1747-0226

Language

en

Location

England

Depositor

Dr Krzysztof Cipora. Deposit date: 23 April 2020