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Levelling the playing field? Towards a critical-social perspective on digital entrepreneurship

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journal contribution
posted on 12.07.2019, 15:05 authored by Angela Martinez Dy
This conceptual paper critically analyses whether digital technologies have the potential to level the entrepreneurial playing field, and presents a more comprehensive and nuanced view of an increasingly significant yet underexplored phenomenon. Drawing upon three broad theoretical lenses: neoclassical economic entrepreneurship theory, cyberfeminist theories of technology and social embeddedness approaches to entrepreneurship, it critiques popular assumptions about digital entrepreneurship as an equalising force. It develops a novel critical-social perspective on digital entrepreneurship and an innovative typology of the landscape. Such an approach highlights a range of digital entrepreneurial activity and actors excluded from mainstream view, theorises the impact of technological requirements and socially distributed resources, and concludes that optimistic promises of success have been, and are likely to continue to be, realized primarily by those already in the top rungs of the social ladder.

Funding

PhD scholarship at Nottingham University Business School, the Vice-Chancellor’s Scholarship for Research Excellence.

History

School

  • Loughborough University London

Published in

Futures

Volume

135

Citation

MARTINEZ DY, A., 2019. Levelling the playing field? Towards a critical-social perspective on digital entrepreneurship. Futures, doi:10.1016/j.futures.2019.102438.

Publisher

© Elsevier

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Elsevier

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Futures and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.futures.2019.102438

Acceptance date

03/07/2019

Publication date

2019-07-09

Copyright date

2022

ISSN

0016-3287

Language

en

Article number

102438

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