Chelotti_PaG 9(1) - Managing Disintegration_ How the European Parliament Responded and Adapted to Brexit.pdf (480.33 kB)
Download file

Managing disintegration: How the European Parliament responded and adapted to Brexit

Download (480.33 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 28.01.2021, 14:15 by Edoardo Bressanelli, Nicola ChelottiNicola Chelotti, Wilhelm Lehmann
Brexit makes both a direct and an indirect impact on the European Parliament (EP). The most direct consequence is the withdrawal of the 73-member strong UK contingent and the changing size of the political groups. Yet, the impact of Brexit is also felt in more oblique ways. Focussing on the role and influence of the EP in the EU–UK negotiations, and of the British delegation in the EP, this article shows that the process, and not just the outcome of Brexit, has significant organisational implications for the EP and its political groups. Moreover, it also showcases the importance of informal rules and norms of behaviour, which were affected by Brexit well ahead of any formal change to the UK status as a Member State. The EP and its leadership ensured the active involvement of the EP in the negotiating process—albeit in different ways for the withdrawal agreement and the future relationship—and sought to minimise the costs of Brexit, reducing the clout of British members particularly in the allocation of legislative reports.

History

School

  • Loughborough University London

Published in

Politics and Governance

Volume

9

Issue

1

Pages

16 - 26

Publisher

Cogitatio

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Cogitatio under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

12/11/2020

Publication date

2021-01-27

Copyright date

2021

eISSN

2183-2463

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Nicola Chelotti. Deposit date: 28 January 2021