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Mastery of structured quantities like finger or dice patterns predict arithmetic performance

journal contribution
posted on 21.01.2021, 09:39 by Isabella Luise Kreilinger, Stephanie Roesch, Korbinian Moeller, Silvia Pixner
In the present study, we investigated whether structured quantities like finger or dice patterns are enumerated better than unstructured quantities because they may not require counting. Moreover, we hypothesized children’s mastery of structured quantities to predict their later arithmetic performance longitudinally. In particular, we expected that children more proficient in enumerating structured quantities early in their numerical development, should develop more effective calculation strategies later because they may rely on counting less. Therefore, we conducted a longitudinal study (including 116 children, 58 girls) over the course of about 7 months from preschool (at about 6 years of age) to the middle of first grade. Results showed that structured quantities were indeed enumerated more accurately and faster than unstructured quantities in preschool. Additionally, we observed significant associations of enumeration of structured and unstructured with children’s addition performance in first grade. However, regression analysis indicated only enumeration of structured but not unstructured quantities to significantly predict later addition performance. In sum, this longitudinal study clearly indicates that mastery of structured quantities seems to be beneficial for children’s development of basic arithmetic abilities.

Funding

Tyrolean science fond (TWF: Uni-0404-2101)

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematics Education Centre

Published in

Cognitive Processing

Volume

22

Issue

1

Pages

93-104

Publisher

Springer

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Marta Olivetti Belardinelli and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature

Publisher statement

This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Cognitive Processing. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10339-020-00994-4.

Acceptance date

18/09/2020

Publication date

2020-10-06

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

1612-4782

eISSN

1612-4790

Language

en

Depositor

Prof Korbinian Moeller. Deposit date: 19 January 2021