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Mental health and other factors associated with work productivity post injury in the UK: multicentre cohort study

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journal contribution
posted on 2021-11-09, 11:27 authored by Blerina Kellezi, P Dhiman, Carol Coupland, J Whitehead, Richard Morriss, Stephen Joseph, Kate Beckett, Jude Sleney, Jo BarnesJo Barnes, Denise Kendrick
Introduction
Mental health conditions are a major contributor to productivity loss and are common after injury. This study quantifies postinjury productivity loss and its association with preinjury and postinjury mental health, injury, demographic, health, social and other factors.
Methods
Multicentre, longitudinal study recruiting hospitalised employed individuals aged 16–69 years with unintentional injuries, followed up at 1, 2, 4 and 12 months. Participants completed questionnaires on injury, demographic factors, health (including mental health), social factors, other factors and on-the-job productivity upon return to work (RTW). ORs were estimated for above median productivity loss using random effects logistic regression.
Results
217 adults had made an RTW at 2, 4 or 12 months after injury: 29% at 2 months, 66% at 4 months and 83% at 12 months. Productivity loss reduced over time: 3.3% of working time at 2 months, 1.7% at 4 months, 1% at 12 months. Significantly higher productivity loss was associated with preinjury psychiatric conditions (OR 21.40, 95% CI 3.50 to 130.78) and post-traumatic stress avoidance symptoms at 1 month (OR for 1-unit increase in score 1.15, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.22). Significantly lower productivity loss was associated with male gender (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.74), upper and lower limb injuries (vs other body regions, OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.81) and sports injuries (vs home, OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.78). Preinjury psychiatric conditions and gender remained significant in analysis of multiply imputed data.
Conclusions
Unintentional injury results in substantial productivity loss. Females, those with preinjury psychiatric conditions and those with post-traumatic stress avoidance symptoms experience greater productivity loss and may require additional support to enable successful RTW.

Funding

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) Nottinghamshire Derbyshire and Lincolnshire

NIHR CLAHRC East Midlands

Nottingham NIHR Biomedical Research Centre.

History

School

  • Design and Creative Arts

Department

  • Design

Published in

Injury Prevention

Volume

28

Issue

2

Pages

131-140

Publisher

BMJ Publishing Group

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Author(s) (or their employer(s))

Publisher statement

This article has been accepted for publication in Injury Prevention, 2021 following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at https://doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2021-044311

Acceptance date

2021-07-31

Publication date

2021-08-30

Copyright date

2022

ISSN

1353-8047

eISSN

1475-5785

Language

  • en

Depositor

Dr Jo Barnes. Deposit date: 8 November 2021

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