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Mothers’ perceptions of self-efficacy and satisfaction with parenting are related to their use of controlling and positive food parenting practices

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posted on 16.09.2021, 14:49 authored by Clare HolleyClare Holley, Emma HaycraftEmma Haycraft
Perceptions of parenting competence are comprised of self-efficacy and satisfaction with parenting. Parenting competence is linked to differential outcomes across numerous parenting domains. To date, few studies have explored the relationships between maternal self-efficacy and food parenting practices, deploying different measures and age ranges, and yielding conflicting findings. Therefore, the current study sought to explore relationships between the two dimensions of perceived parenting competence and the use of controlling and positive food parenting practices. UK mothers (N=269) of 18- to 59-month-old children completed measures of both dimensions of perceived parenting competence (i.e. parenting self-efficacy and satisfaction), controlling (maladaptive) and positive (health promoting) food parenting practices. Correlational analyses identified relationships between perceptions of competence and use of food parenting practices. Self-efficacy and satisfaction with parenting were positively associated with the use of most positive food parenting practices. Greater parenting satisfaction, but not parenting efficacy, was associated with lower use of some of the potentially detrimental controlling food parenting practices. Neither parenting self-efficacy nor satisfaction with parenting was related to mothers’ reported use of pressure to eat. In conclusion, supporting and promoting greater maternal self-efficacy and satisfaction with parenting may be a useful target for public health interventions and for professionals working with families with the aim of promoting optimal parenting to support children’s development of healthy eating habits. Future research should seek to further elucidate the current findings with a longitudinal design.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Maternal and Child Nutrition

Volume

18

Issue

1

Publisher

Wiley

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Wiley under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

01/09/2021

Publication date

2021-09-15

Copyright date

2022

ISSN

1740-8695

eISSN

1740-8709

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Emma Haycraft. Deposit date: 1 September 2021

Article number

e13272