PIIS2468266717300749.pdf (555.2 kB)
Download file

Overweight, obesity and risk of cardiometabolic multimorbidity: pooled analysis of individual-level data for 120,813 adults from 16 cohort studies from the USA and Europe

Download (555.2 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 25.05.2017, 14:20 authored by Mika Kivimaki, Eeva Kuosma, Jane E. Ferrie, Ritva Luukkonen, Solja T. Nyberg, Lars Alfredsson, G. David Batty, Eric Brunner, Eleonor I. Fransson, Marcel Goldberg, Anders Knutsson, Markku Koskenvuo, Maria Nordin, Tuula Oksanen, Jaana Pentti, Reiner Rugulies, Martin J. Shipley, Archana Singh-Manoux, Andrew Steptoe, Sakari Suominen, Tores Theorell, Jussi Vahtera, Marianna Virtanen, Peter J.M. Westerholm, Hugo Westerlund, Marie Zins, Mark Hamer, Joshua A. Bell, Adam G. Tabak, Markus Jokela
Background Although overweight and obesity have been studied in relation to individual cardiometabolic diseases, their association with risk of cardiometabolic multimorbidity is poorly understood. Here we aimed to establish the risk of incident cardiometabolic multimorbidity (ie, at least two from: type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke) in adults who are overweight and obese compared with those who are a healthy weight. Methods We pooled individual-participant data for BMI and incident cardiometabolic multimorbidity from 16 prospective cohort studies from the USA and Europe. Participants included in the analyses were 35 years or older and had data available for BMI at baseline and for type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke at baseline and follow-up. We excluded participants with a diagnosis of diabetes, coronary heart disease, or stroke at or before study baseline. According to WHO recommendations, we classified BMI into categories of healthy (20·0–24·9 kg/m²), overweight (25·0–29·9 kg/m²), class I (mild) obesity (30·0–34·9 kg/m²), and class II and III (severe) obesity (≥35·0 kg/m²). We used an inclusive definition of underweight (<20 kg/m²) to achieve sufficient case numbers for analysis. The main outcome was cardiometabolic multimorbidity (ie, developing at least two from: type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke). Incident cardiometabolic multimorbidity was ascertained via resurvey or linkage to electronic medical records (including hospital admissions and death). We analysed data from each cohort separately using logistic regression and then pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analysis. Findings Participants were 120 813 adults (mean age 51·4 years, range 35–103; 71445 women) who did not have diabetes, coronary heart disease, or stroke at study baseline (1973–2012). During a mean follow-up of 10·7 years (1995–2014), we identified 1627 cases of multimorbidity. After adjustment for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, compared with individuals with a healthy weight, the risk of developing cardiometabolic multimorbidity in overweight individuals was twice as high (odds ratio [OR] 2·0, 95% CI 1·7–2·4; p<0·0001), almost five times higher for individuals with class I obesity (4·5, 3·5–5·8; p<0·0001), and almost 15 times higher for individuals with classes II and III obesity combined (14·5, 10·1–21·0; p<0·0001). This association was noted in men and women, young and old, and white and non-white participants, and was not dependent on the method of exposure assessment or outcome ascertainment. In analyses of different combinations of cardiometabolic conditions, odds ratios associated with classes II and III obesity were 2·2 (95% CI 1·9–2·6) for vascular disease only (coronary heart disease or stroke), 12·0 (8·1–17·9) for vascular disease followed by diabetes, 18·6 (16·6–20·9) for diabetes only, and 29·8 (21·7–40·8) for diabetes followed by vascular disease. Interpretation The risk of cardiometabolic multimorbidity increases as BMI increases; from double in overweight people to more than ten times in severely obese people compared with individuals with a healthy BMI. Our findings highlight the need for clinicians to actively screen for diabetes in overweight and obese patients with vascular disease, and pay increased attention to prevention of vascular disease in obese individuals with diabetes.

Funding

The IPD-Work Consortium has received funding from NordForsk (the Nordic Research Programme on Health and Welfare). MK receives funding from the UK Medical Research Council (K013351), the Academy of Finland (311492), and the Finnish Work Environment Fund. EK, STN, and RL were supported by NordForsk. AT has received funding from the UK Medical Research Council (K013351) and JAB has received funding from Cancer Research UK (C18281/A19169).

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

The Lancet Public Health

Citation

KIVIMAKI, M. ... et al, 2017. Overweight, obesity and risk of cardiometabolic multimorbidity: pooled analysis of individual-level data for 120,813 adults from 16 cohort studies from the USA and Europe. The Lancet Public Health, 2 (6), pp. e277–e285.

Publisher

Elsevier © The Author(s)

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/4.0/

Acceptance date

15/05/2017

Publication date

2017

Notes

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Elsevier under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

ISSN

1474-547X

Language

en

Usage metrics

Keywords

Licence

Exports