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Paralympic legacy: exploring the impact of the Games on the perceptions of young people with disabilities

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journal contribution
posted on 23.09.2016, 08:58 by Janine CoatesJanine Coates, Philip Vickerman
The London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games aimed to deliver a legacy to citizens of the United Kingdom, which included inspiring a generation of young people to participate in sport. This study aimed to understand the legacy of the Paralympic Games for children with disabilities. Eight adolescents (11-16 years of age) with physical disabilities were interviewed about their perceptions of the Paralympic Games. Thematic analysis found three key themes which further our understanding about the Paralympic legacy. These were: Paralympians as role models; changing perceptions of disability and the motivating nature of the Paralympics. Findings demonstrate the Games were inspirational for children with disabilities, improving their self-perceptions. This is discussed in relation to previous literature and core recommendations are made.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly

Citation

COATES, J. and VICKERMAN, P., 2016. Paralympic legacy: exploring the impact of the Games on the perceptions of young people with disabilities. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly, 33 (4), pp.338-357.

Publisher

© Human Kinetics

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Acceptance date

28/04/2016

Publication date

2016

Notes

This article was published in the journal Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly [© Human Kinetics] and the definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/APAQ.2014-0237.

ISSN

0736-5829

eISSN

1543-2777

Language

en