File(s) under permanent embargo

Reason: This item is currently closed access.

Passive downdraught evaporative cooling. 1, Concept and precedents

journal contribution
posted on 07.10.2016, 08:46 authored by Kevin LomasKevin Lomas, N.T. Bowman, Herbert Eppel, Darren Robinson, Malcolm J. Cook
This is the first of a series of four papers that describe a 3-year EU-funded research project into the application of passive downdraught evaporative cooling to non- domestic buildings. In this paper various evaporative cooling techniques are reviewed. By spraying fine drop lets of water at the top of atria, a downdraught of air cooled by evaporation can be produced. Such direct eva porative cooling using an evaporation tower appears to be a suitable approach for partly displacing the need for air-conditioning in hot, dry climates. It can satisfy fresh air requirements and reduce or eliminate demand for mechanical cooling. Examples of this cooling technique in Southern Europe and the Middle East have already demonstrated its operation and potential energy sav ings. However, limitations, primarily due to control of the system, have been identified. This introductory paper presents the theoretical basis of evaporative cooling, reviews some historical precedents, and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses. Three further papers in this series will disseminate the main findings of the project.

Funding

The funding received for this project from the EU Joule III programme is gratefully acknowledged.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Published in

Indoor and Built Environment

Volume

9

Issue

5

Pages

284 - 290

Citation

LOMAS, K. ... et al., 2000. Passive downdraught evaporative cooling. 1, Concept and precedents. Indoor and Built Environment, 9 (5), pp.284-290.

Publisher

© Karger

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2000

Notes

Closed access.

ISSN

1420-326X

eISSN

1423-0070

Language

en