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Physiological and pathophysiological concentrations of fatty acids induce lipid droplet accumulation and impair functional performance of tissue engineered skeletal muscle

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journal contribution
posted on 25.03.2021, 13:43 by Mark C Turner, Rowan Rimington, Neil MartinNeil Martin, Jacob Fleming, Andrew CapelAndrew Capel, Leanne Hodson, Mark LewisMark Lewis
Fatty acids (FA) exert physiological and pathophysiological effects leading to changes in skeletal muscle metabolism and function, however, in vitro models to investigate these changes are limited. These experiments sought to establish the effects of physiological and pathophysiological concentrations of exogenous FA upon the function of tissue engineered skeletal muscle (TESkM). Cultured initially for 14 days, C2C12 TESkM was exposed to FA‐free bovine serum albumin alone or conjugated to a FA mixture (oleic, palmitic, linoleic, and α‐linoleic acids [OPLA] [ratio 45:30:24:1%]) at different concentrations (200 or 800 µM) for an additional 4 days. Subsequently, TESkM morphology, functional capacity, gene expression and insulin signaling were analyzed. There was a dose response increase in the number and size of lipid droplets within the TESkM (p < .05). Exposure to exogenous FA increased the messenger RNA expression of genes involved in lipid storage (perilipin 2 [p < .05]) and metabolism (pyruvate dehydrogenase lipoamide kinase isozyme 4 [p < .01]) in a dose dependent manner. TESkM force production was reduced (tetanic and single twitch) (p < .05) and increases in transcription of type I slow twitch fiber isoform, myosin heavy chain 7, were observed when cultured with 200 µM OPLA compared to control (p < .01). Four days of OPLA exposure results in lipid accumulation in TESkM which in turn results in changes in muscle function and metabolism; thus, providing insight ito the functional and mechanistic changes of TESkM in response to exogenous FA.

Funding

NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre

British Heart Foundation Senior Research Fellow in Basic Science (FS/15/56/31645

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Journal of Cellular Physiology

Volume

236

Issue

10

Pages

7033-7044

Publisher

Wiley

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Wiley under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

08/03/2021

Publication date

2021-03-19

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0021-9541

eISSN

1097-4652

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Neil Martin. Deposit date: 19 March 2021