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Self-determination in recreational exercise: Associations with lapse and post-lapse emotions

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journal contribution
posted on 13.06.2019, 14:04 authored by Stephen Murphy, Ian TaylorIan Taylor
Objective: Self-determination theory describes how an individual’s underlying motives determine self-regulatory outcomes. Building on this, we investigated whether different types of motivation predict lapse in exercise behavior, and particularly the emotional responses to lapse in the form of guilt, anxiety, and relief. Method: Study 1 entailed a self-report, cross-sectional investigation using structural equation modeling to test study hypotheses (N = 343, M age: 24.30 years, 215 female). Study 2 employed a 21-day daily diary using multi-level modeling to test study hypotheses (N = 89, M age: 25.90 years, 55 female). Motivation was self-reported at the beginning of the study with all other variables self-reported daily. Results: Autonomous motivation was shown to negatively associate with lapse. When lapse occurred, autonomous motivation was inconsistently associated with the tendency for individuals to feel decreased relief and guilt. In contrast, introjected regulation displayed inconsistent associations with lapse, but increased the likelihood that individuals would experience guilt and anxiety following lapse. External regulation did not reliably predict lapse and emotions across studies. Conclusions: Our findings suggest autonomous motivation may protect against lapses in goal-directed behavior. Controlling forms of motivation, however, may promote less-optimal emotional processes implicated in poor self-regulation.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Psychology of Sport and Exercise

Volume

45

Pages

101548

Citation

MURPHY, S.L. and TAYLOR, I.M., 2019. Self-determination in recreational exercise: Associations with lapse and post-lapse emotions. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 45: 101548.

Publisher

© Elsevier

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Psychology of Sport and Exercise and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.101548

Acceptance date

04/06/2019

Publication date

2019-06-06

Copyright date

2019

ISSN

1469-0292

Language

en

Article number

101548