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Simultaneous measurement of single cell mechanics.pdf (1.61 MB)

Simultaneous measurement of single-cell mechanics and cell-to-materials adhesion using fluidic force microscopy

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posted on 2024-02-12, 16:03 authored by Ma Luo, Wenjian Yang, Tyrell N Cartwright, Jonathan MG Higgins, Jinju ChenJinju Chen

The connection between cells and their substrate is essential for biological processes such as cell migration. Atomic force microscopy nanoindentation has often been adopted to measure single-cell mechanics. Very recently, fluidic force microscopy has been developed to enable rapid measurements of cell adhesion. However, simultaneous characterization of the cell-to-material adhesion and viscoelastic properties of the same cell is challenging. In this study, we present a new approach to simultaneously determine these properties for single cells, using fluidic force microscopy. For MCF-7 cells grown on tissue-culture-treated polystyrene surfaces, we found that the adhesive force and adhesion energy were correlated for each cell. Well-spread cells tended to have stronger adhesion, which may be due to the greater area of the contact between cellular adhesion receptors and the surface. By contrast, the viscoelastic properties of MCF-7 cells cultured on the same surface appeared to have little dependence on cell shape. This methodology provides an integrated approach to better understand the biophysics of multiple cell types.

Funding

Multiscale characterization of complex materials using a combination of atomic force microscopy and optical coherence tomography

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

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History

School

  • Aeronautical, Automotive, Chemical and Materials Engineering

Department

  • Materials

Published in

Langmuir

Volume

38

Issue

2

Pages

620 - 628

Publisher

American Chemical Society

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© American Chemical Society

Publisher statement

This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Langmuir, copyright © 2022 American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.1c01973

Publication date

2022-01-04

Copyright date

2022

ISSN

0743-7463

eISSN

1520-5827

Language

  • en

Depositor

Prof Jinju Chen. Deposit date: 11 February 2024

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