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Sleep quality and adverse incidents in secure mental health settings

journal contribution
posted on 13.05.2022, 13:53 by Iuliana HartescuIuliana Hartescu, Poppy GardinerPoppy Gardiner, Alessandra Girardi, Kieran C Breen, Ashimesh Roychowdhury, Paul M Wallang, Kevin Morgan

Sleep disturbance has been associated with adverse incidents among male forensic inpatients. This study examined relationships between sleep quality and the occurrence/severity of adverse incidents among male and female patients in a secure psychiatric hospital setting. Sleep disturbance was assessed in 756 (361 female) patients at baseline (assessment 1), with 476 (253 female) patients followed up ≥1 month later (assessment 2). The occurrence and severity of adverse incidents was extracted from health records. Risk associated with sleep disturbance was assessed in adjusted binary logistic regression models with the occurrence of at least one adverse incident during the 7-day baseline period, or during the subsequent 30-day follow-up period as dependent. Prospective associations with adverse incidents among new cases of sleep disturbance, and ‘good sleepers’, were analysed using X2. Sleep disturbance and female gender were independently associated with a significantly elevated risk of adverse incidents in the baseline models. At follow-up, new cases of sleep disturbance showed the highest level of participation in adverse incidents, while ‘good sleepers’ showed both the lowest participation in, and the lowest impact scores resulting from adverse incidents. The management of sleep quality could help reduce participation in adverse incidents among inpatients in secure psychiatric environments. 

Funding

Loughborough University

St Andrews Healthcare

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© Taylor & Francis

Publisher statement

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology on 11 May 2022, available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14789949.2022.2073902.

Acceptance date

29/04/2022

Publication date

2022-05-11

Copyright date

2022

ISSN

1478-9949

eISSN

1478-9957

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Iuliana Hartescu. Deposit date: 12 May 2022

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