Sport Spectators and the Social Consequences of Commodification - Critical Perpsetives from Scottish Football.pdf (692.32 kB)
Download file

Sport spectators and the social consequences of commodification: critical perspectives from Scottish football

Download (692.32 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 22.08.2014, 08:51 authored by Richard GiulianottiRichard Giulianotti
The commodification of football has been the subject of substantial sociological debate but has received relatively limited scrutiny in terms of sustained comparative empirical research. This article draws heavily on interviews with supporter groups, journalists, and officials in Scottish football to examine a range of issues relating to fan experiences and understandings of football's commodification. The author examines how fans respond to their labeling as customers and considers whether they are alienated or marginalized from football in economic and cultural terms. The author explores how the game's commodification can be at the expense of themost deserving supporters and undermines the future reproduction of fan communities. The author concludes by arguing for a nuanced sociological reading of supporters in regard to commodification, which appreciates both the fans' market pragmatism and their normative critiques of distributive justice in the game.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Journal of Sport and Social Issues

Volume

29

Issue

4

Pages

386 - 410

Citation

GIULIANOTTI, R., 2005. Sport spectators and the social consequences of commodification: critical perspectives from Scottish football. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 29 (4), pp. 386-410.

Publisher

© SAGE

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

Publication date

2005

ISSN

0193-7235

eISSN

1552-7638

Language

en