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Sports drink intake pattern affects exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during running

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journal contribution
posted on 30.03.2020, 12:09 authored by Stephen MearsStephen Mears, Benjamin Boxer, David Sheldon, Hannah Wardley, Caroline A Tarnowski, Lewis JamesLewis James, Carl Hulston
PURPOSE: To determine whether the pattern of carbohydrate sports drink ingestion during prolonged sub-maximal running affects exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates and gastrointestinal (GI) comfort. METHODS: Twelve well-trained male runners (27 ± 7 y, 67.9 ± 6.7 kg, V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak: 68 ± 7 mL·kg·min) completed two exercise trials of 100 min steady state running at 70% V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak. In each of the trials, 1 L of a 10% dextrose solution, enriched with [U-C] glucose, was consumed as either 200 mL every 20 min (CHO-20) or 50 mL every 5 min (CHO-5). Expired breath and venous blood samples were collected at rest and every 20 min during exercise. Subjective scales of GI comfort were recorded at regular intervals. RESULTS: Average exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates were 23% higher during exercise in CHO-20 (0.38 ± 0.11 vs. 0.31 ± 0.11 g·min; P=0.017). Peak exogenous carbohydrate oxidation was also higher in CHO-20 (0.68 ± 0.14 g·min vs. 0.61 ± 0.14 g·min; P=0.004). During exercise, total carbohydrate oxidation (CHO-20: 2.15 ± 0.47; CHO-5: 2.23 ± 0.45 g·min, P=0.412) and endogenous carbohydrate oxidation (CHO-20: 1.78 ± 0.45; CHO-5: 1.92 ± 0.40 g·min; P=0.148) were not different between trials. Average serum glucose (P=0.952) and insulin (P=0.373) concentrations were not different between trials. There were no differences in reported symptoms of GI comfort and stomach bloatedness (P>0.05), with only 3% of reported scores classed as severe (>5 out of 10). CONCLUSION: Ingestion of a larger volume of carbohydrate solution at less frequent intervals during prolonged submaximal running increased exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates. Neither drinking pattern resulted in increased markers of GI discomfort to a severe level.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

Volume

52

Issue

9

Pages

1976 - 1982

Publisher

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© American College of Sports Medicine

Publisher statement

This is a non-final version of an article published in final form in MEARS, S. ... et al, 2020. Sports drink intake pattern affects exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during running. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 52 (9), pp.1976-1982, doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000002334.

Acceptance date

27/02/2020

Publication date

2020-03-10

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

0195-9131

eISSN

1530-0315

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Stephen Mears. Deposit date: 30 March 2020

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