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Street work policy in England, UK: insights from stakeholders

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journal contribution
posted on 09.05.2016, 10:25 by Rizwana S. Hussain, Marcus EnochMarcus Enoch, Kirti RuikarKirti Ruikar, Nigel T. Brien, David J. Gartside
Road works and street works can be highly disruptive, expensive and deleterious to highway structures and infrastructure planning, yet these activities must take place if modern societies are to continue to function. In helping to strike this balance, this study investigates the public policy landscape of highway excavation management in England. Semi-structured interviews with industry stakeholders highlighted the complexity of the industry and revealed that a number of issues compromise effective management. Principal problems included Street Authorities failing to take enough ownership of the coordination process, highway legislation not encouraging joint working due to inherent challenges arising from reinstatement guarantees, and entrenched attitudes and adversarial practices in the construction industry encouraging silo working. Key recommendations include amending highway legislation to support and recognise multi-agency working and Street Authorities undertaking reinstatements on behalf of undertakers, thus helping to reduce fragmentation and discharge undertakers of onerous guarantees which contribute to silo working.

Funding

This work was sponsored by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council [grant number EP/G037272/1] and Derby City Council.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Published in

Infrastructure Asset Management

Citation

HUSSAIN, R.S. ... et al, 2016. Street work policy in England, UK: insights from stakeholders. Infrastructure Asset Management, 3 (2), pp.61-70.

Publisher

ICE Publishing (© Institute of Civil Engineers)

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 International (CC BY 3.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Acceptance date

19/04/2016

Publication date

2016-05-13

Copyright date

2016

Notes

Published with permission by the ICE under the CC-BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/)

ISSN

2053-0242

eISSN

2053-0250

Language

en