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The Acceptability, Feasibility and Effectiveness of Wearable Activity Trackers for Increasing Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents- A Systematic Review - ijerph-18-06211.pdf (822.39 kB)

The acceptability, feasibility and effectiveness of wearable activity trackers for increasing physical activity in children and adolescents: a systematic review

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posted on 2021-06-09, 09:51 authored by Amy Creaser, Stacy ClemesStacy Clemes, Silvia CostaSilvia Costa, Jennifer Hall, Nicola D Ridgers, Sally E Barber, Daniel Bingham
Wearable activity trackers (wearables) embed numerous behaviour change techniques (BCTs) that have previously been shown to increase adult physical activity (PA). With few children and adolescents achieving PA guidelines, it is crucial to explore ways to increase their PA. This systematic review examined the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of wearables and their potential mechanisms of action for increasing PA in 5 to 19-year-olds. A systematic search of six databases was conducted, including data from the start date of each database to December 2019 (PROSPERO registration: CRD42020164506). Thirty-three studies were included. Most studies (70%) included only adolescents (10 to 19 years). There was some—but largely mixed—evidence that wearables increase steps and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA and reduce sedentary behaviour. There were no apparent differences in effectiveness based on the number of BCTs used and between studies using a wearable alone or as part of a multi-component intervention. Qualitative findings suggested wearables increased motivation to be physically active via self-monitoring, goal setting, feedback, and competition. However, children and adolescents reported technical difficulties and a novelty effect when using wearables, which may impact wearables’ long-term use. More rigorous and long-term studies investigating the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of wearables in 5 to 19-year-olds are warranted.

Funding

This review is funded as part of a PhD studentship by the Born in Bradford study. The Born in Bradford study receives core infrastructure funding from the Wellcome Trust (WT101597MA) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), under its NIHR ARC Yorkshire and Humber (NIHR200166) and Clinical Research Network (CRN) research delivery support. For this work, funding from Sport England’s Local Delivery Pilot was awarded. S.A.C is supported by the NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre—Lifestyle theme.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Published in

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Volume

18

Issue

12

Publisher

MDPI AG

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by MDPI under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

2021-06-06

Publication date

2021-06-08

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

1660-4601

eISSN

1660-4601

Language

  • en

Depositor

Dr Stacy Clemes. Deposit date: 8 June 2021

Article number

6211

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