King et al 2010 The Acute Effects of Swimming on Appetite, Food Intake, and Plasma Acylated Ghrelin.pdf (619.86 kB)
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The acute effects of swimming on appetite, food intake, and plasma acylated ghrelin

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journal contribution
posted on 30.07.2012, 12:44 by James A. King, Lucy K. Wasse, David J. Stensel
Swimming may stimulate appetite and food intake but empirical data are lacking. This study examined appetite, food intake, and plasma acylated ghrelin responses to swimming. Fourteen healthy males completed a swimming trial and a control trial in a random order. Sixtymin after breakfast participants swam for 60 min and then rested for six hours. Participants rested throughout the control trial. During trials appetite wasmeasured at 30 min intervals and acylated ghrelin was assessed periodically (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7.5 h. N = 10). Appetite was suppressed during exercise before increasing in the hours after. Acylated ghrelin was suppressed during exercise. Swimming did not alter energy or macronutrient intake assessed at buffet meals (total trial energy intake: control 9161 kJ, swimming 9749 kJ). These findings suggest that swimming stimulates appetite but indicate that acylated ghrelin and food intake are resistant to change in the hours afterwards.

History

School

  • Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Citation

KING, J.A., WASSE, L.K. and STENSEL, D.J., 2011. The acute effects of swimming on appetite, food intake, and plasma acylated ghrelin. Journal of Obesity, Article ID 351628, 8pp.

Publisher

(© James A. King et al) Hindawi Publishing Corporation

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Publication date

2011

Notes

Copyright © 2011 James A. King et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

ISSN

2090-0708

eISSN

2090-0716

Language

en

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Keywords

Exports