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The benefits of teaching on comprehension, motivation, and perceived difficulty: Empirical evidence of teaching expectancy and the interactivity of teaching

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journal contribution
posted on 29.03.2021, 12:49 authored by Ying Wang, Lijia Lin, Ouhao ChenOuhao Chen
Background. Research regarding teaching expectancy has been mostly conducted in research laboratories with college students. These studies provide insufficient evidence regarding its effect on learners’ delayed comprehension. Moreover, the relative superiority of teaching a peer face to face compared to teaching an imagined peer lacks empirical support.
Aims. The purpose of the study was to investigate the interactivity of teaching by comparing peer teaching to imagined teaching, as well as enhancing the generalizability of the teaching expectancy effect by testing it in a secondary school environment.
Sample. A total of 597 students (282 males) from 12 classes in a secondary school were recruited to participate in the study as part of their psychology course.
Methods. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions formed by a 2 (teaching expectancy vs. testing expectancy) 9 3 (peer teaching vs. imagined teaching vs. no teaching) between-subjects design. Their immediate and delayed comprehension tests, motivation, and perceived difficulty were measured as dependent variables.
Results. Imagined teaching enhanced both immediate and delayed comprehension, but peer teaching only enhanced immediate comprehension. Moreover, the effects of imagined teaching on perceived difficulty and motivation were dependent upon teaching expectancy or testing expectancy.
Conclusions. Our findings provide empirical evidence to the existing theoretical frameworks, but caution should be taken when applying imagined teaching in practice.

History

School

  • Science

Department

  • Mathematics Education Centre

Published in

British Journal of Educational Psychology

Volume

91

Issue

4

Pages

1275-1290

Publisher

Wiley

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

© 2021 British Psychological Society

Publisher statement

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Wang, Y., Lin, Li. and Chen, O., The benefits of teaching on comprehension, motivation, and perceived difficulty: Empirical evidence of teaching expectancy and the interactivity of teaching. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 91(4), pp. 1275-1290, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/bjep.12416. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions

Acceptance date

09/03/2021

Publication date

2021-03-23

Copyright date

2021

ISSN

0007-0998

eISSN

2044-8279

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Ouhao Chen. Deposit date: 24 March 2021