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The development and initial validation of a self-report job precariousness scale suitable for use with young adults who study and work

journal contribution
posted on 24.03.2021, 12:10 by Peter A. Creed, Michelle Hood, Eva SelenkoEva Selenko, Louella Bagley
Precarious employment has been increasing worldwide. Yet there are few scales suitable to assess it, and no scales to measure perceived job precariousness in working students who are particularly vulnerable. Using classic test theory, we generated 21 job precariousness items and had them reviewed by experts. In Study 1 (N = 282, 63% female, mean age 22 years), exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors of job conditions, security, remuneration, and flexibility, each with 3 items. In Study 2 (N = 211, 75% female, mean age 22 years), confirmatory factor analysis confirmed that this four-factor model was the best fit compared to unidimensional, second-order, and bifactor models. Cronbach’s α coefficients for all factors and the full-scale score were sound (all >.78). Validity was supported by showing that precariousness was related negatively to life satisfaction and employer support and positively to job insecurity, financial strain, and subjective social status. Precariousness was unrelated to age, sex, and hours worked. The Job Precariousness Scale has the potential to promote research into the effects of precarious employment on working students’ current and future functioning and achievement and how experiences of precariousness influence the development of a precarity identity.

Funding

Griffith University Centre for Work, Organisation, and Well Being

School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University

History

School

  • Business and Economics

Department

  • Business

Published in

Journal of Career Assessment

Volume

28

Issue

4

Pages

636 - 654

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Journal of Career Assessment and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1177/1069072720920788. Users who receive access to an article through a repository are reminded that the article is protected by copyright and reuse is restricted to non-commercial and no derivative uses. Users may also download and save a local copy of an article accessed in an institutional repository for the user's personal reference.

Acceptance date

01/04/2020

Publication date

2020-04-29

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

1069-0727

eISSN

1552-4590

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Eva Selenko. Deposit date: 18 March 2021