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The effect of film development on primary breakup in a prefilming airblast atomizer

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journal contribution
posted on 2024-03-28, 16:46 authored by Jack WetherellJack Wetherell, Andrew GarmoryAndrew Garmory

Liquid fueled gas turbines are likely to remain a dominant force in aviation propulsion for the foreseeable future, and therefore understanding the atomization process is key to meeting future emissions and performance legislation. To make experiments and simulations possible, simplified geometry and boundary conditions are often used, for example, simulations of primary atomization often use a fixed film height and velocity. This paper aims to quantify the effect of a fully developed unsteady film on the atomization process. A custom Coupled Level Set & Volume of Fluid (CLSVOF) solver with adaptive meshing built in OpenFOAM v9 is used. A simulation of the atomization process in the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology atomization experiment (Warncke et al., 2017, “Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Primary Breakup of an Airblasted Liquid Sheet,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 91, pp. 208–224) is presented. A precursor simulation of the film development is used to provide accurate, temporally and spatially resolved inlet boundary conditions. These results are compared to previous CLSVOF simulations from Wetherell et al. (2020, “Coupled Level Set Volume of Fluid Simulations of Prefilming Airblast Atomization With Adaptive Meshing,” ASME Paper No. GT2020-14213)” using traditional boundary conditions. The unsteady film has doubled the modal ligament length and widened the distribution, and is now in better agreement with experimental measurements. A clear correlation in both time and space is observed between the film, atomization process, and spray. The sauter mean diameter (SMD) is significantly increased, again giving better agreement with the experiment. A discussion of extracting statistical descriptions of the spray is given, outlining the unfeasible computational cost required to converge droplet diameter distributions and other high order statistics for a case such as this.

Funding

EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Gas Turbine Aerodynamics

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

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Sulis: An EPSRC platform for ensemble computing delivered by HPC Midlands+

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

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HPC Midlands+ consortium

History

School

  • Aeronautical, Automotive, Chemical and Materials Engineering

Department

  • Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering

Published in

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power

Volume

146

Issue

9

Publisher

ASME International

Version

  • AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Rights holder

©ASME

Publisher statement

This paper was accepted for publication in the journal Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power and the definitive published version is available at https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4064729

Acceptance date

2024-01-30

Publication date

2024-03-20

Copyright date

2024

ISSN

0742-4795

eISSN

1528-8919

Language

  • en

Depositor

Jack Wetherell. Deposit date: 28 March 2024

Article number

091012

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