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The impact of 36 years of grazing management on soil nitrogen (N) supply rate and Salix repens N status and internal cycling in dune slacks

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journal contribution
posted on 14.10.2015, 10:56 authored by Jonathan MillettJonathan Millett, Sally Edmondson
Aims: To determine the impact of long-term rabbit and sheep grazing on Salix repens N status (green and abscised leaf N content and C:N ratio), internal N dynamics and soil N supply rate in dune slacks. Methods: Herbivore exclosures were erected in dune slacks at Ainsdale Sand Dunes NNR, creating three grazing treatments: rabbit grazing; rabbits excluded for 36 years; rabbit grazing followed by sheep and rabbit grazing for 18 years. Soil N supply rate was analysed using ion exchange membranes; leaf N dynamics of S. repens were measured over one summer. Results: Soil N supply rate was higher in ungrazed plots. There was no difference in green leaf NMASS or C:N ratio between treatments, but N dynamics differed. Adding sheep to existing rabbit grazing reduced S. repens N resorption efficiency (REFF) from 67 to 37 %; excluding rabbits had no impact. Litter NMASS was lower and C:N ratio higher in ungrazed plots. Conclusions: Grazing can impact significantly on leaf N resorption, but this impact depends on the grazing regime.

Funding

This study was funded by the Botanical Society of the British Isles.

History

School

  • Social Sciences

Department

  • Geography and Environment

Published in

Plant and Soil

Citation

MILLETT, J. and EDMONDSON, S., 2015. The impact of 36 years of grazing management on soil nitrogen (N) supply rate and Salix repens N status and internal cycling in dune slacks. Plant and Soil, 396(1), pp. 411–420.

Publisher

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2015

Notes

The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-015-2628-9

ISSN

0032-079X

Language

en