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The importance of infiltration pathways in assessing and modelling overheating risks in multi-residential buildings

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journal contribution
posted on 25.03.2020, 09:54 by Rob McLeod, Michael Swainson, Christina Hopfe, Kostas Mourkos, Chris Goodier
With the help of building diagnostics, the causes and solutions to complex problems in buildings can be determined. In central and greater London, an increasing number of cases of chronic, year-round, overheating in buildings have been reported. We present three cases of unexpected temperatures in multi-storey residential buildings. Detailed analysis and modelling of these scenarios have led to an investigation of whether the way in which infiltration is currently modelled in building performance simulation may be exerting a pronounced effect on the results of overheating studies. An EnergyPlus model, of one of the dwellings in a multi-residential building in London, was created to investigate the influence of infiltration and exfiltration pathway assumptions on the prediction of overheating. The simulation results were compared to empirical data and show that the predicted indoor temperatures are highly sensitive to how the infiltration airflow network is modelled. The findings of this study have been used to provide practical guidance for modellers and building designers on critical aspects to consider when creating building performance simulation models to ensure more reliable outcomes.

Funding

BRE Trust for the provision of a grant to undertake this research project as part of the ‘Resilience – tackling overheating in urban dwellings’ project.

History

School

  • Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering

Published in

Building Services Engineering Research and Technology

Volume

41

Issue

3

Pages

261 - 279

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Sage under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Publication date

2020-02-25

Copyright date

2020

ISSN

0143-6244

eISSN

1477-0849

Language

en

Depositor

Dr Chris Goodier. Deposit date: 24 March 2020

Licence

Exports

Loughborough Publications

Categories

Licence

Exports