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Experimental Physiology - 2023 - Eglin - The peripheral vascular responses in non‐freezing cold injury and matched controls.pdf (683.41 kB)

The peripheral vascular responses in non‐freezing cold injury and matched controls

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posted on 2023-03-02, 15:45 authored by Clare M Eglin, Jennifer Wright, Matthew MaleyMatthew Maley, Sarah Hollis, Heather Massey, Hugh Montgomery, Michael J Tipton

The impact of non-freezing cold injury (NFCI) on peripheral vascular function was investigated. Individuals with NFCI (NFCI group) and closely matched controls with either similar (COLD group) or limited (CON group) previous cold exposure were compared (n = 16). Peripheral cutaneous vascular responses to deep inspiration (DI), occlusion (PORH), local cutaneous heating (LH) and iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were investigated. The responses to a cold sensitivity test (CST) involving immersion of a foot in 15°C water for 2 min followed by spontaneous rewarming, and a foot cooling protocol (footplate cooled from 34°C to 15°C), were also examined. The vasoconstrictor response to DI was lower in NFCI compared to CON (toe: 73 (28)% vs. 91 (17)%; P = 0.003). The responses to PORH, LH and iontophoresis were not reduced compared to either COLD or CON. During the CST, toe skin temperature rewarmed more slowly in NFCI than COLD or CON (10 min: 27.4 (2.3)°C vs. 30.7 (3.7)°C and 31.7 (3.9)°C, P < 0.05, respectively); however, no differences were observed during the footplate cooling. NFCI were more cold-intolerant (P < 0.0001) and reported colder and more uncomfortable feet during the CST and footplate cooling than COLD and CON (P < 0.05). NFCI showed a decreased sensitivity to sympathetic vasoconstrictor activation than CON and greater cold sensitivity (CST) compared to COLD and CON. None of the other vascular function tests indicated endothelial dysfunction. However, NFCI perceived their extremities to be colder and more uncomfortable/painful than the controls.

Funding

Department of Army Health and Performance, British Army

National Institute for Health Research's Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre at University College London Hospitals

History

School

  • Design and Creative Arts

Department

  • Design

Published in

Experimental Physiology

Volume

108

Issue

3

Pages

420-437

Publisher

Wiley

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Rights holder

© The Authors

Publisher statement

This is an Open Access Article. It is published by Wiley under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY). Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Acceptance date

2023-01-20

Publication date

2023-02-19

Copyright date

2023

ISSN

0958-0670

eISSN

1469-445X

Language

  • en

Depositor

Dr Matthew Maley. Deposit date: 21 February 2023

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