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The prevalence of musculoskeletal troubles among car drivers

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journal contribution
posted on 02.09.2014, 10:55 authored by J. Mark Porter, Diane GyiDiane Gyi
In order to explore the relationship between car driving and musculoskeletal troubles, a cross-sectional structured-interview survey of low to high mileage drivers (including individuals who drove as part of their job) was conducted based on the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. The results clearly showed that exposure to car driving was associated with reported sickness absence due to low back trouble and that those who drive as part of their job appear to be more at risk from low back trouble than those whose jobs primarily involve sitting (not driving) and standing activities. The frequency of reported discomfort also increased with higher annual mileage. In addition, drivers of cars with more adjustable driving packages had fewer reported musculoskeletal troubles. This identifies an urgent need for the training of managers of fleet vehicles in the importance of developing measures to reduce this problem. For example, the selection of an individual's car with respect to comfort and postural criteria.

Funding

The authors would like to acknowledge the Brite-Euram European Initiative (Project 5549) who funded this research. Loughborough University was one of several European based partners in the consortium (which also included car manufacturers and seat designers) whose joint objective was to improve car seat design.

History

School

  • Design

Published in

OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE-OXFORD

Volume

52

Issue

1

Pages

4 - 12 (9)

Citation

PORTER, J.M. and GYI, D.E., 2002. The prevalence of musculoskeletal troubles among car drivers. Occupational Medicine, 52(1), pp.4-12.

Publisher

Oxford University Press (© Society of Occupational Medicine)

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Publisher statement

This work is made available according to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) licence. Full details of this licence are available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Publication date

2002

Notes

This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Occupational Medicine following peer review. The version of record is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/occmed/52.1.4

ISSN

0962-7480

Language

en